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Engine Classifications

Core Count

  • Single-Core
    An engine that runs one system. Most common.
  • Multi-Core
    An engine that can run multiple systems. Less common.

Power Process

  • Simple
    Details An engine that turns on, reads the inserted cartridge, and then turns off at request.
    Example Most consoles usually function this way, and in real life, it was the standard up until the sixth generation consoles, which introduced a system menu into their BIOS.
  • Subsystem
    Details An engine that turns on, proceeds to the system, and then turns off at request.
    Example Not many consoles function this way, and in real life, sixth generation consoles could do this with increasing distance from needing a cartridge until it became unnecessary in the seventh and eighth generation consoles for a disc.

Optional Attributes

  • Standardized
    Details The engine relies on standards set by the manufacturer or other entity.
    Example Many consoles have different API's meaning games made on one cannot easily be ported to another. A standardized console uses universal commands rather than system-specific ones.
  • Scalable
    Details The engine can be applied to multiple products of varying feature-sets.
  • Remote
    Details The engine can be controlled by devices like remotes and wireless controlinators.
  • Softmoddable
    Details The engine can be modified with other functions.
  • Hardmoddable
    Details The engine can be modified with other homebrew devices.

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